Does Eating Fat Really Make You Fat?

By Catherine Roy Feb 21, 2018

As the second chapter of our three-part National Heart Health Month series, we're talking about a topic that can sometimes confuse even the best of us: the difference between fat in our diets and fat in our bodies (and the implications of both on our health).

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Does Your Total Cholesterol Number Even Matter?

By Ashley Reaver, MS, RD, CSSD Feb 13, 2018

February is National Heart Health Month. So, we thought we'd do our part in spreading awareness by bringing you a three-part heart health blog series. First up? The ever-ominous "total cholesterol."

As one of the most ordered lab tests, total cholesterol can provide a high level glance at how your body is handling lipids, or fats. According to the CDC, roughly nine percent of all doctor’s visits include a cholesterol test.1 So, how should you interpret your total cholesterol value? Is the whole greater than the sum of its parts?

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How Will the New Cholesterol Guidelines Impact Your Health?

By Perrin Braun Dec 11, 2013

 

Big news for those of you who are concerned about your heart health: the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recently released revised cholesterol treatment guidelines that are designed to reduce the risk for heart attack and stroke. The new guidelines, which were last updated in 2004, mark the most significant change in cardiovascular disease prevention in nearly thirty years!

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The Skinny on Dietary Fat

By Perrin Braun Apr 11, 2012

 

Fat may no longer be a dieter’s worst enemy, but misconceptions about this important macronutrient still run rampant. In the 1990s, the low-fat diet was thought to be a straightforward route to preventing heart disease, some cancers, and obesity. The USDA Food Pyramid perpetuated the idea that an ideal diet should be low in fat, and didn’t differentiate well between sources or types of fat. But things are changing.

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My Eye-Opening InsideTracker Experience

By Meghan Johnson Jan 11, 2012

As a public health and nutrition graduate student, I didn’t think I had much to worry about when I went to have my blood drawn for my personalized InsideTracker analysis. Given my education and resources, having nutrient deficiencies would be not only a surprise, but a bit of an embarrassment. I believe in walking the walk in addition to talking the talk and try to set an example with my diet and exercise regimen. I cook the majority of my own meals, which generally consist of whole grains, vegetables, fish, bean or soy-based proteins and occasionally lean poultry. I typically snack on fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, granola, or yogurt.  Now of course, I sometimes stray from my dietary staples when dining out to celebrate birthdays or promotions, during holiday parties, and for the occasional ‘just because’ dinner with friends. You only live once, right? But I stick to a plant-based, whole foods diet for the majority of my meals. Click here to learn how InsideTracker can recommend personalized diet and exercise plans that will fit your unique physical needs!

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