Is Meat Bad for You? A Nutrition Scientist Weighs In.

For quite a while now, nutrition research has agreed that it's healthiest to limit our intake of red and processed meat. But this has recently been challenged by new research from the Nutritional Recommendations International Consortium (NutriRECS), published in the prestigious Annals of Internal Medicine. The authors from NutriRECS recommended new guidelines to continue with our average 4.5 servings of red and processed meat per week as Americans. [1] 

Why Avocados Are Healthy: The Science Behind Everyone's Obsession

Avocados have been attracting attention from bloggers and dietitians alike—and for good reason! They're versatile: they can be sliced in sandwiches, diced on salads, smashed on toast or turned into guacamole. And their benefits in the body are equally as versatile: they can help your heart, eyes, and even waistline. Let’s take a deeper dive into why paying the extra $1.95 for guac gets you so much more than an elevated burrito.

Too Much of a Good Thing - The U-Shape of HDL Cholesterol

Science is constantly changing. One day something can be healthy and the next day it’s not. It can certainly be frustrating, but that is why InsideTracker is here to dig through the science and present you with the most up-to-date research. Not surprisingly, one of these big swings in scientific knowledge recently happened with one of our most tested biomarkers, HDL cholesterol. It was previously thought, and still widely believed, that the more HDL cholesterol, or the often-termed “good ...

How to Lower Cholesterol Naturally

We all know that plant foods are good for us. They contain loads of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that keep our bodies fueled with the essential components for optimal health. Some of the beneficial phytochemicals are well known such as lycopene and resveratrol; others are more obscure, like plant sterols and stanols, which InsideTracker recommends. So what are they? And why are they recommended for optimizing cholesterol?

Does Supplementing with Spirulina Improve Your Health and Performance?

One of the most common new fitness trends is eating a mysterious blue-green algae called “spirulina.” Trendy fitness magazines and celebrities hail it as a top-secret “superfood” you take as a supplement or powder. However, are any of these claims actually based on real, scientific evidence? Or is spirulina as dubious as a health product shamelessly advertised by the Kardashians on Instagram? Below we sort out the fact and fiction by delving into the high-quality that shows how spirulina might ...
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