A New Study Finds That Flavonoids and Heart Health May Be Related via the Microbiome

Flavonoid-rich foods like berries, apples, pears, and wine appear to have a positive effect on blood pressure levels. This association is also partially explained by characteristics of the gut microbiome, according to a recent study published in Hypertension. [1] Past studies have provided strong evidence that the composition of the gut microbiome can partly explain the association between dietary flavonoids and cardiovascular health, but the present study is the first to provide data ...

Are Artificial Sweeteners Bad for You? Their Role in Weight Loss, Appetite, and the Gut Microbiome

The first artificial sweetener was developed in 1879, and despite being some of the most scientifically studied food substances on the market, their use remains controversial. [1] "Diet," reduced sugar, and sugar-free foods and beverages manage to maintain sweetness with the help of sugar substitutes like artificial sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners don’t raise blood glucose (also called blood sugar) levels and have been promoted as a way to reduce excess sugar intake and better manage chronic ...

The Gut-Brain Axis: How Gut Health Influences Dementia Risk

Though genetics certainly play a role, recent research shows that modifiable lifestyle factors like diet and exercise can actually influence someone's risk of developing age-related cognitive diseases like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other forms of dementia. In recent years, investigators have explored the role of the gut microbiome in the connection between lifestyle and disease risk. Emerging evidence shows that dementia patients have significantly higher pro-inflammatory ...

How Gut Health Affects Athletic Performance

Research shows that a healthy gut microbiome can be beneficial for many aspects of overall health, wellness, and longevity. Optimizing gut health can promote immune system health, reduce inflammation, balance hormones, and improve the digestion and absorption of food—all actions that are also important components of being a healthy athlete. So, is there a connection between gut health and performance? Here's a synopsis of what the science says about the connection between a healthy gut and ...

Don't Get April Fooled by These Latest Health Fads

Being in the information era, various "health and wellness" trends have taken off in popularity thanks to the reach of social media. This boom has resulted in widely-held (but scientifically-inaccurate) beliefs on the effects of various foods, compounds, and supplements on health. Though lectins, apple cider vinegar, bone broth, collagen, and biotin have all become web buzzwords, only a few have scientific evidence backing the common claims about them.

A Comprehensive Review of the Habits that Affect Gut Health

Your body is your home. It’s also home to trillions of other living organisms. Trillions of microbes that is. And the composition of this microscopic community can have major implications on your wellness and performance. Fortunately, there are multiple steps you can take to support gut health and reap related benefits. Numerous habits, from meal timing, to sleep habits, to antioxidant consumption, can influence the makeup of your microbiome and its relationship with the rest of your body.

Optimize Your Microbiome with the New InsideTracker Gut Health Goal

Research surrounding the gut microbiome and its impact on the body’s systems has taken off in recent years. And all this time, we've been stealthily collecting the evidence and preparing it for InsideTracker's algorithms, waiting for the day that the evidence base got strong enough to meet the high scientific requirement for the InsideTracker system. Finally, the day is here! Gut health research now meets InsideTracker's rigorous scientific criteria, and we can now give action-backed ...

How Food Can Improve Mental Health and Symptoms of Seasonal Depression

It’s the time of the year again where the days grow shorter as the seasons change. As daylight fades from fall through winter, we’re more susceptible to suffer from seasonal depression, also known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, or S.A.D. According to Mental Health America, up to 5% of the population in the U.S. experiences seasonal depression.[1] But until more recently, the link between nutrition and mental health has been significantly overlooked. Here, we will take a closer look at how our ...
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